summer stamina Featured

Summer stamina: Advice for your summer dancing at BDC

During your summer dancing at Broadway Dance Center, you’ll be sweating a lot and dancing more than you maybe do normally. Here’s how to have stamina, lower injury risk and reduce muscle soreness.

Timing is everything.

Energy balance is the secret for dancing stronger, improving body composition, building muscle, having more endurance and improving performance. Backed by sound science, the concept of energy balance is all about timing healthy meals and snacks to work for you. Plus, managing your energy balance intelligently can play an important role in injury prevention. This means fueling the activity you are about to do in the next 1-3 hours. When you provide fuel for working muscles (and brain), you improve jump height, stamina and strength. You also actually keep your body from struggling to produce its own fuel from inside the body. That could mean breaking down hard earned muscle tissue to be converted to fuel.

Broadway Dance Center.

Have a great summer at BDC!

Broadway Dance Center is always jumping…literally. But during the summer, the studio is exploding with even more classes and intensives to help you become the best dancer you can be. In the summer, BDC’s list of regular classes goes up, from about 350 to 400 each and every week, with exceptional guest teachers who you can’t always access during the year. But as a special treat, BDC brings in these artists to reach you.

Younger dancers have several special opportunities to enhance their dancing with BDC this summer at the Summer Intensive series. Dancers ages 8-11, 12-16 and 16-21 can enroll in jam-packed, four-day intensives designed exclusively for them and their peers, and open only to intensive students. Teens and seniors will also be able to sample some of BDC’s regular classes so they can dance with all the pros who come through the studio’sdoors. 

Bettye Morrow

BDC’s ‘Remembering Bettye Morrow’ Class: Commemorating an unsung tap heroine 

We all remember the names of tap greats – Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, the Copasetics, Gregory Hines and Savion Glover. Looking more deeply and broadly, we see that far more dancemakers were influential and accomplished in their own ways. Sometimes it’s up to people who learned from them and worked with them to honor their legacy.

That’s what Justin Boccitto and Germaine Salsberg, BDC tap teachers, recently did in memory of tap icon Bettye Morrow, who passed away in 2016. Boccitto studied with Morrow extensively. Salsberg took Morrow’s class when she was still teaching at BDC, and “saw it as a fun challenge”. On Friday, June 29, they held an Advanced Beginner tap masterclass with Morrow’s material and in her teaching style.

Sara Mearns for So Danca

Sara Mearns to lead master class and Só Dança collection reveal

New York City Ballet Principal Sara Mearns is one of the boldest, most popular ballerinas of our time. She is musical, dynamic, intense and glamorous. And this coming Monday, July 9, Broadway Dance Center students have the chance of a lifetime to take class from Mearns and learn some of the prima ballerina’s most valuable lessons that she uses in the studio and on stage. And to make it even more exciting, this special master class will also include a reveal of the 2018 Só Dança Sara Mearns Collection, with select items to be on sale during the event and in the Shop at BDC.

The Sara Mearns Master Class & Só Dança Collection Reveal will include a 90-minute ballet class, geared toward advanced ballet dancers ages 13 and over. Ballet slippers are required, and pointe shoes are optional for barre and center work.

BDC launches Hip Hop Foundation Series

Hip hop has become almost a blanket term for so many new and unique styles of dance — street dance, locking, breaking, vogueing, commercial dance, jazz-funk, heels, popping and contemporary hip hop. Hip hop was (and still is) an evolutionary style said to have begun in the 1970s and ‘80s with the rise of hip hop music, dance crews, improv battles and television programs like Soul Train and films such as Wild Style and Breakin’.

Today, the various styles of hip hop include pop culture references, gymnastics and martial arts, fashion inspiration, hybrid with contemporary dance, and even a strong presence in musical theater. With all of these offshoots, however, it can be difficult to learn the basic fundamentals of hip hop in a dance studio setting. Because hip hop is always developing with the changing times, dance workshops and classes tend to focus on the newest, trendiest hip hop styles. But just like each ballet class has common terminology, set exercises and an understanding of the dance form’s history, so should hip hop dance.

BDC’s next Musical Theater Weekend Intensive

It’s not too late to sign up for BDC’s Musical Theater Weekend Intensive (June 23-24). This jam-packed two-day intensive is geared toward aspiring Broadway triple-threats and pre-professional performers. The workshop includes dance classes with industry-leading choreographers such as Josh Bergasse (On the Town, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Smash), Rachelle Rak (Dance Moms, Fosse), Randy Skinner (White Christmas, 42ndStreet), Sarah O’Gleby (Frozen) and Ricky Hinds (NewsiesCome From Away).

Participants will also partake in a professional seminar with a music director, mock audition with a casting director, and Q&A session with lead agent Lucille diCampli. Dancers will leave the intensive with an understanding of how to craft a professional resume, what it’s like to attend a Broadway open call, how to land an agent, and the styles and choreography of current Broadway shows.

Tap into your bone density!

Bones are dynamic! Even though they are hard, bones are living and continually changing parts of your body that have cells working on them that are designed specifically to either make new bone or break it down. While it may sound strange that our body would want to break down our own bones, it’s a really important process for keeping the whole entire body healthy! There are a couple of reasons for this, and one is that minerals such as calcium are stored in your bones. Of course, you’ve probably heard this a lot, and heard that calcium is really important for healthy bones. What you may not have heard is that calcium is critically important for many functions taking place in the body, including nervous system activity and muscle contractions, and when your body needs calcium for all of these important things, it is going to have to get it from somewhere. That somewhere is your bones.

“Developing peak bone mass (the most bone mineral possible) in the teenage years through the 30s is the cornerstone of optimal bone health,” says Dr. Dorothy Fink, an endocrinologist and internist at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, where she often treats dancers. “There are cells in the body that build bone (osteoblasts) and cells that break it down (osteoclasts). These cells work together every day to keep your bones in the best shape possible.” 

Should Dancers Wear Flip Flops

Should Dancers Wear Flip Flops?

Do race car drivers have to have the best car possible and meticulously take care of it? Do tennis players have to use the best possible racquet? Do professional athletes also need the best possible trainers and medical care? Of course! Well, dancers are no different.

Unfortunately, while dancers often take good care of their body and seek the best doctors they can find, they frequently write off foot pain and chronic conditions as part of the deal. Dreadful feet have become synonymous with the job title “dancer”, especially “ballet dancer”.

Kitty Carter’s Team Classes at Broadway Dance Center

Most dancers can name at least one – those teachers who really push hard and demand the most, but it’s clear that they do so because they care. Most often, they leave a real and lasting impression. Students look back and feel grateful for what they learned, and how they were led to grow, from this teacher of tough exterior, soft interior. Kitty Carter seems to be one of these teachers. And, for the first time, she recently came to Broadway Dance Center (BDC) on April 30, to teach her signature Team Audition Prep class!

Carter grew up dedicated to dance, spending summers studying with Luigi and loving Broadway in New York City. She trained in various styles of dance, and obtained her BFA at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. Her career grew, and she became a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader. After retiring from the squad, she became its Technical Advisor/Coach. She also owns the dance studio Kitty Carter’s Dance Factory (Dallas), where she teaches Mondays through Thursdays.