Winter: A good time to start your dance journal

Winter is a time when nature becomes dormant. Although the human world buzzes on, in alignment with the nature all around us, we are drawn to rest and reflect. How might this apply to artists, with reflection (on both inner and outer) fruitful for creative output and personal growth?

Might winter be a good time to begin journaling as a dancer? How, practically, are some ways to start doing that? Here, we speak with Betsy Miller, adjunct professor of dance at Salem State University, and Boston-based dance artist; and Karen Klein, founder and artistic director of teXtmoVes, to learn more about beginning to journal for creative processes in winter.

Eating well on a dancer's budget

Tips, tricks and hacks for eating well on a dancer’s budget

We all know how integral healthy eating plays into our overall well-being and performance, but for many dancers, spending $7-11 on a pound of supposedly “grass fed” beef is just not feasible.

The common misconception is that eating healthy has to be expensive, and while some healthy foods can be expensive (especially pre-prepared foods), in reality it’s easy to eat well on a tight budget if you know what to do. Here is a list of five hacks from nutrition experts to eat well for less.

How can you be a ‘mindful’ dancer?

Have you ever thought about being a more “mindful” dancer? How might one go about doing that? Why might one want to do so, in the first place? Being mindful involves staying attuned to the present moment, and remaining fully engaged in the task at hand. Given dance’s real-time physical and mental demands, it seems evident enough as to why remaining mindful would be advantageous for dancers.

Here, we speak with Stephen Ursprung, assistant professor of Dance Studies at Dean College; and Danielle Davidson, dance artist and assistant professor in Dance at The Boston Conservatory at Berklee, to learn more about the what, why and how of mindfulness and dance training.

How to make the most of your drop-in classes

Studios like Broadway Dance Center are amazing – they offer hundreds of classes a week, are rich in every dance style imaginable, and have something for dancers of all ages and levels. There is so much to choose from! You can literally drop in at any time of the day and find yourself in a class surrounded by dancers from all over the globe, Broadway stars, professional ballet dancers, up-and-coming choreographers and those who take class simply for fun.

That said, you may be in a class packed to capacity, with a teacher you may not know and a style you may not be the most comfortable in. But all of those challenges are good for you and can fuel some serious inspiration! So how can you make the most of your drop-in classes at BDC?

Foods to Fight Inflammation

5 foods for recovery and inflammation

It’s no surprise that some of our top inflammation fighting foods are all plants. While there are individual nutrients we could add to this list like vitamin D, omega 3 fatty acids and protein from beans, the synergistic effects of antioxidants like vitamin C, vitamin A, folate and beta-carotene with phytonutrients like flavonoids, anthocyanins and lentinan work like a team of support for overworked muscles and the cardiovascular system, and they’re easily available at your grocery store.

Food is a powerful ally in a dancer’s recovery toolbox. Make sure you eat a veggie-heavy meal with a protein source within one hour after dance, and don’t forget to hydrate. You don’t have to break the bank with expensive superfoods or supplements to feel results. Simple foods like sweet potatoes, greens and black beans are cheap and nutritious. These five listed below are only a starting point but have the research to back up some of the health claims. The bottom line is: eat more plants. 

Planning your group visit to BDC

Do you live outside of NYC but wish that you and your students could dance all day at a studio like Broadway Dance Center, where there are over 350 classes in all styles each week? Well, dreams can come true!

BDC welcomes groups year-round and offers discounted rates for arranged group visits. So even if you live across the country, you can still partake in all the exciting classes that BDC has to offer! And BDC’s Group Services staff will work closely with you when planning your visit, as they know that each dancer in your group may have different needs and expectations, so your stay can be completely customized.

From Studio to Street: 5 No-fuss Fashion Tips

If you’re a dancer, you have a bag. And probably a big one, to fit your dancewear, dance shoes, regular clothes, water bottle, snacks, wallet, personal items… The list goes on. Whether you live in NYC and take classes at BDC around your work/audition/rehearsal schedule, or you’re visiting the Big Apple and are busy sightseeing before or after class, you probably need a lot of stuff with you every day. But why not lighten your load a bit?

There are ways to pack smart and best dress from the studio to the street without packing your entire closet. Here are some of our favorite items (available at the BDC Shop!) and tips on how to still look fashionable while also comfortable and practical.

Broadway Dance Center.

Have a great summer at BDC!

Broadway Dance Center is always jumping…literally. But during the summer, the studio is exploding with even more classes and intensives to help you become the best dancer you can be. In the summer, BDC’s list of regular classes goes up, from about 350 to 400 each and every week, with exceptional guest teachers who you can’t always access during the year. But as a special treat, BDC brings in these artists to reach you.

Younger dancers have several special opportunities to enhance their dancing with BDC this summer at the Summer Intensive series. Dancers ages 8-11, 12-16 and 16-21 can enroll in jam-packed, four-day intensives designed exclusively for them and their peers, and open only to intensive students. Teens and seniors will also be able to sample some of BDC’s regular classes so they can dance with all the pros who come through the studio’sdoors. 

summer stamina

Summer stamina: Advice for your summer dancing at BDC

During your summer dancing at Broadway Dance Center, you’ll be sweating a lot and dancing more than you maybe do normally. Here’s how to have stamina, lower injury risk and reduce muscle soreness.

Timing is everything.

Energy balance is the secret for dancing stronger, improving body composition, building muscle, having more endurance and improving performance. Backed by sound science, the concept of energy balance is all about timing healthy meals and snacks to work for you. Plus, managing your energy balance intelligently can play an important role in injury prevention. This means fueling the activity you are about to do in the next 1-3 hours. When you provide fuel for working muscles (and brain), you improve jump height, stamina and strength. You also actually keep your body from struggling to produce its own fuel from inside the body. That could mean breaking down hard earned muscle tissue to be converted to fuel.