Student Profile: Stephanie Brooks – Apassionata

Not Your Typical Tour
Apassionata, Dance Captain, Stephanie Brooks (Professional Semester Alum.)

“APASSIONATA has been Europe’s most popular live arena shows for
nearly a decade, thrilling more than five million fans across 15 countries with a breathtaking display of the beauty and the bond between horse and rider, man’s strongest and most trusted animal.” – Apassionata.com

Audition
During my final mock audition in BDC’s professional semester, I received representation from McDonalds Selsnicks and Associates (MSA). One of the benefits of having an agent is that sometimes they have closed calls with just their clients, if their choreographer was booked for the job. When MSA sent out the breakdown for a horse show audition, I didn’t know what to expect. However, I was excited when I saw that Lorin Latarro was choreographing; I loved her choreography in The Musical Theatre Performance Project last year. The audition combination had a lot of personality, was technically challenging, and stylistic. After cuts were made, she paired us up for partnering. I was overjoyed when I received the call that I booked the job and even more so when I found out a fellow colleague of mine was going to do it with me. (Go Wildcats!!!!)

Rehearsal
We rehearsed in NYC and learned a lot of material quickly, keeping in mind that a lot would change once we actually got to the arena. Our first stop was Kentucky. Technical rehearsal consisted of long days in the dark cold arena. These rehearsals involve a lot of hurry up and wait, but I found that during the waiting is when you can learn the most if you stay engaged. It was such a privilege to watch Ken Billington (96+ Broadway Shows) do the lighting design and learn from Scott Farris (dir. “Chicago” and “Walking with Dinosaurs”) as he brought together American theater and European Equestrian riders. Lorin Latarro (Currently choreographing “Scandalous” set to hit Broadway this October) pulled from her diverse performance background and allowed us to collaborate on certain parts. It was a very artistically fulfilling process.

Overcoming Obstacles
Dancing in sand, running with flags and fire torches was strenuous on our bodies. For body maintenance, I did some form of Pilates, Yoga, and rolled out my muscles with a tennis ball. We had to be flexible and try to figure out how to adapt the choreography in the sand, and how not to spook the horses or get spooked by them. During rehearsals you could hear Portuguese, French, German, Ukrainian, Icelandic, and English being bantered across the gigantic arena. After one of the first runs of the show, the horse choreographer called everyone together and our choreographer jokingly said it looked like a medieval conference. Picture 40+ horses and riders gathered together speaking different languages and four American dancers and a choreographer standing in a giant sand box. It was a surreal experience.

Stepping Up
As Dance Captain, my responsibilities were to run any extra rehearsals, communicate with the production team, maintain the artistic integrity of the choreography and spacing, make sure that the dancers safety and needs were met, and promote team unity. This production was a learning process for all of us. Most of our stage crew came from the rock concert world and we had to share with them certain theater protocols and vice versa. The communication between the tech crew, dancers and riders was extremely important, because the horses weren’t always predicable. We couldn’t depend on entering or exiting on a musical cue and it forced us to be quick on our feet, listen and watch each other. We developed physical and verbal cues and had to go with whatever happened in the moment.

Unique Atmosphere
Some of the perks of this job were that we had amazing caterers who traveled with us, we learned how to ride horses, picked up a little bit of French, Icelandic, and Portuguese, and got to work with and meet incredible people.

Unexpected Close
Due to the financial crisis in Europe, Apassionata’s USA tour came to an end early (It is still running in several countries in Europe). We were given less than 24 hours notice that we were going back to NYC and the rest of the tour was cancelled. Of course, we were sad and it’s always a little unnerving to be without a steady job, but nothing in this business is guaranteed. That’s why it’s important to save when you are doing a show, so that during the slow times you can continue to train and be ready for the next opportunity. I learned a lot from Apassionata and am looking forward to what the future holds.

Gangnam Style

Not Your Typical Tour
Apassionata, Dance Captain, Stephanie Brooks (Professional Semester Alum.)

“APASSIONATA has been Europe’s most popular live arena shows for
nearly a decade, thrilling more than five million fans across 15 countries with a breathtaking display of the beauty and the bond between horse and rider, man’s strongest and most trusted animal.” – Apassionata.com

Audition
During my final mock audition in BDC’s professional semester, I received representation from McDonalds Selsnicks and Associates (MSA). One of the benefits of having an agent is that sometimes they have closed calls with just their clients, if their choreographer was booked for the job. When MSA sent out the breakdown for a horse show audition, I didn’t know what to expect. However, I was excited when I saw that Lorin Latarro was choreographing; I loved her choreography in The Musical Theatre Performance Project last year. The audition combination had a lot of personality, was technically challenging, and stylistic. After cuts were made, she paired us up for partnering. I was overjoyed when I received the call that I booked the job and even more so when I found out a fellow colleague of mine was going to do it with me. (Go Wildcats!!!!)

Rehearsal
We rehearsed in NYC and learned a lot of material quickly, keeping in mind that a lot would change once we actually got to the arena. Our first stop was Kentucky. Technical rehearsal consisted of long days in the dark cold arena. These rehearsals involve a lot of hurry up and wait, but I found that during the waiting is when you can learn the most if you stay engaged. It was such a privilege to watch Ken Billington (96+ Broadway Shows) do the lighting design and learn from Scott Farris (dir. “Chicago” and “Walking with Dinosaurs”) as he brought together American theater and European Equestrian riders. Lorin Latarro (Currently choreographing “Scandalous” set to hit Broadway this October) pulled from her diverse performance background and allowed us to collaborate on certain parts. It was a very artistically fulfilling process.

Overcoming Obstacles
Dancing in sand, running with flags and fire torches was strenuous on our bodies. For body maintenance, I did some form of Pilates, Yoga, and rolled out my muscles with a tennis ball. We had to be flexible and try to figure out how to adapt the choreography in the sand, and how not to spook the horses or get spooked by them. During rehearsals you could hear Portuguese, French, German, Ukrainian, Icelandic, and English being bantered across the gigantic arena. After one of the first runs of the show, the horse choreographer called everyone together and our choreographer jokingly said it looked like a medieval conference. Picture 40+ horses and riders gathered together speaking different languages and four American dancers and a choreographer standing in a giant sand box. It was a surreal experience.

Stepping Up
As Dance Captain, my responsibilities were to run any extra rehearsals, communicate with the production team, maintain the artistic integrity of the choreography and spacing, make sure that the dancers safety and needs were met, and promote team unity. This production was a learning process for all of us. Most of our stage crew came from the rock concert world and we had to share with them certain theater protocols and vice versa. The communication between the tech crew, dancers and riders was extremely important, because the horses weren’t always predicable. We couldn’t depend on entering or exiting on a musical cue and it forced us to be quick on our feet, listen and watch each other. We developed physical and verbal cues and had to go with whatever happened in the moment.

Unique Atmosphere
Some of the perks of this job were that we had amazing caterers who traveled with us, we learned how to ride horses, picked up a little bit of French, Icelandic, and Portuguese, and got to work with and meet incredible people.

Unexpected Close
Due to the financial crisis in Europe, Apassionata’s USA tour came to an end early (It is still running in several countries in Europe). We were given less than 24 hours notice that we were going back to NYC and the rest of the tour was cancelled. Of course, we were sad and it’s always a little unnerving to be without a steady job, but nothing in this business is guaranteed. That’s why it’s important to save when you are doing a show, so that during the slow times you can continue to train and be ready for the next opportunity. I learned a lot from Apassionata and am looking forward to what the future holds.

Fashion at BDC

Fall Fashion Week in New York City is well under way.  But if you ask me, the real fashion show happens everyday here at Broadway Dance Center!

Here are some of our students’ favorite dancewear lines:

BALLET:

clean and classy leotards:

Yumiko

“I personally enjoy Yumiko. They have a really good selection for men. Their unitards are always eye catching due to their interesting cut. Plus if you online you can personalize or customize your outfits.” – Tyrone Bevans (SIP ’12)

“I have gone through dozens of leotards throughout my dance career, none of which fit me as well and last as long as my Yumiko. Yumiko makes gorgeous, flattering leotards with endless customizable possibilities. The price tag may be a little steep, but like with Lululemon, Yumiko products are an investment that will deliver for years. I love wearing my Yumiko to musical theatre auditions with a skirt and character heels – the perfect classic dancer look!” – Laura Volpacchio (SIP ’08)

“My favorite line of dance wear would have to be Yumiko, Finding Men’s dance clothing is often a challenge; especially if you want anything outside of boring old black tights. Yumiko has a range of great cuts and colors for guys and they also offer some great fabric choices.” – Mitchell Dudas (FIP ’09)

Eleve Dancewear

Capezio

“I love Capezio because that have a great selction of men dance clothes no matter what you’re looking for.” – Bryan Moore (SIP ’12)

“I love capezio cause they have cute leotard for a nice prize and an enourmous store near Times Square! Dancers’ heaven!” – Theresa Sivard (ISVP ’11-’12, PS S’12)

Ainsliewear

one-of-a-kind leotards/unitards made just for you:

Class In Dance Shop

“I have to say that I love my unitard and Jazz pants that I bought at “Class In” on 72nd between Broadway and Colombus. It was custom made. I got to pick the style and color for an amazing price.  Its a great fit, great quality! Not to mention if you have a favorite leo they will copy it for an affordable price. They are a little hidden, but definitely a great find!” – Geraldine Rojas

“Class In has GREAT leotards that you can custom design. Many different fabrics, cuts, and prints!” – Jenifer Dillow (PS F’11)

JAZZ/CONTEMPORARY

fun (and funny) T’s and tops:

Sugar and Bruno

“I love Sugar and Bruno because they use creative fashion ideas from all different artists to keep their lines unique.” – Lexie Mollica (PS F’11)

bight bra-tops and booty shorts:

Oxyjen

“Oxygen has class styles, with a slight funky twist that are awesome for class or auditions!” – Molly Day (PS S’12)

“I love the OXYjEN Sweetheart top. The line is super cute and the open back flatters the one part of the body that looks good on every dancer. It’s comfortable and supportive enough for every day wear. It comes is many bright colors and prints. The new Vivian Blaine Outfit is super cute for auditions and comfortable as well.” – Natalie Wise (PS S’12)

funky, avant-garde leotards and biketards:

Jo & Jax

“I love a good Jo & Jax outfit…They’re super comfortable and always super cute too! Definitely my favorite!” – Chrissy Howard (SIP ’12)

“Jo & Jax dancewear helps my lines look longer yet it allows my sexiness to shine through. It makes me feel clean and comfortable in my own skin while allowing me to twist and jump in ridiculous ways.” – Camila de la Parra (SIP ’12)

“I am such a Jo&jax girl! Every item they sell is unique and well made. I don’t know of anyone that looks bad in a jo&jax uni!” – Alyssa Pearson (SIP ’12)

every style of booty shorts under the sun:

Katrina Activewear

“My favorite jazz pants are the Katrinawear because they’re long enough for my legs, and they come in fun colors. ” – Emily Tanner (SIP ’12)

“Katrinawear is so durable! Mine has lasted me for years!” – Samantha Sweed (PS F’11)

perfect-fit tank tops and yoga pants:

Victorias Secret

“I wear a lot of Victoria Secrets yoga collection because there pants come in tall length and there tops are the most supportive while still being super cute.” Allyson Tolbert

Bloch

“Bloch has a wide range of fashion foward and comfortable dancewear items. The peices are affordable and I love how the employees are all dancers, they always know how to help.” – Bianca Argyros (ISVP ’11)


HIP HOP

eye-catching leggings:

American Apparel

“I love American Apparel for its duality to wear in and out of class.” – Lara Luzim (PS S’12)

swag-a-licious sweatpants:

Urban Empire

“My favorite dancewear line is Urban Empire because their prices are fair and their swag is off the richter!” – Alex Isenberg (SIP ’12)

“Urban empire has a very unique style of sweatpants. Their sweatpants comes in various colors and thickness of the fabric. I old several light weight sweatpants which is great in keeping me cool and giving me flexibility to dance.” – Kelvin Kim (SIP ’12, PS F’12)

“Urban is a very consistent sweatpants line. Designed to reach the hip-hop and street jazz demographic, Urban has proven to be very comfortable and fashionable.” – Pierce Cady-Penny

Nappy Tabs

“My absolute favorite gear is the nappy tabs harem zipper tux pants!” – Cat Cogliandro (BDC faculty and retail store director)

“Nappy Tabs has clothing for any style of dancer you are. They have shorts, shirts, harem pants and sweats that never go out of style. I still wear my first pair of Nappy Tabs from 7 years ago!” – Chrissy Palczewski (SIP ’11, retail store manager)

Oh, and did we mention Nappy Tabs is sold at the BDC retail store?! Check it out!

THEATER/TAP

leg-lengthening dance pants:

Lanteri

“The “Lanteri Pant” are a dancer’s best friend. They are universally flattering, and come many colors to suit any audition!” – Jessica Seavor (PS S’11)

“Lanteri pants are a theater dancer’s saving grace.  The pants truly elongate and lengthen the body while tightly forming to the cut of one’s leg.  They are extra long folding over the LaDuca, giving the illusion that the leg never ends!” – Lizz Picini (SIP ’11)

“You have got to love Lanteri jazz pants! The sleek, smooth, lines it gives you don’t compare to others, and the long length is perfect for us tall girls.” – Melanie Walode (PS F’11)

“I would say that Lanteri wear is my favorite brand of dance wear lines because the fit is really nice and their pieces are long lasting. I’ve had some of mine for more than five years!” – Laura Ksobiech (SIP ’12)

short, black tap skirts:

Lululemon Athletica

“I absolutely love Lululemon. Their clothes are so comfortable, cute, and actually breathe a little bit which is great when you are sweaty! It may be expensive, but I think its definitely worth it because everything lasts forever! – Julia Udine (PS S’12)
“I’m a Lululemon girl all the way! I lovee their sports bras, shorts, and fun workout tops.  I’m from canada, so I’ve been wearing Lulu for a while and we have them everywhere here in Montreal.” – Jenny Dailey (SIP ’12)
“I love the luluemon brand because it is built specifically in mind for us dancers. Its great in class wear because the clothes are flattering on any body type and you are able to see your lines and alignment. I know when I feel good I dance that much better and lululemon helps me do just that.” – Victoria Fowler (SIP ’12)
“Lulu tops fit great and provide great support and I love all colors and styles they come in!” – Nikki Croker (PS F’11)

Theater Review: Porgy and Bess

If you haven’t yet seen the Broadway revival of “Porgy and Bess,” get yourself to the Richard Rogers Theatre (46th @ 8th) before the show closes on September 23rd.  Tony Award winners Audra McDonald and Norm Lewis are spectacular of course, but the choreography of the show is not to be overlooked.

Gershwin’s 1935 musical is known as an “American folk opera,” remembered for it’s classic songs like “Summertime” and “I Got Plenty o’ Nuttin’.”  But the revival, choreographed by Ronald K. Brown (founder of Evidence Dance Company and guest choreographer at Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater), employs dance not as part of the “Broadway triple-threat” mentality, but to acknowledge dance and movement as parts of human nature.

“Porgy and Bess” may not have the partnering of “Memphis” or the tumbling and triple pirouettes of “Newsies,” but it has two important qualities: 1) sentimentality and 2) authenticity.  Brown’s choreography emotes and naturally supports the mood of the scene – whether it’s mourning at a funeral or celebrating at a picnic.  In an interview with Dance Magazine, Brown explained,

“I felt kind of liberated. Some people might think I would need dancers who could do toe touches and flips”—here he adds a hearty laugh— “but I’m like, let’s have the community. How would they move at the funeral? At the picnic? Through their lives? I could discover how those people would move.”

Ensemble member, Andrea Jones-Sojola, added,

“These are dances that an ancestor of a person living in 1939 would have taught their children and grandchildren. We’re doing movements onstage from West Africa or the Caribbean that our grandparents probably taught us. They’re authentic dances that would have been passed down from generation to generation. So instead of just busting out in a dance number, they’re very authentic. And the fact that a real dancer doesn’t have to do it makes me all the more comfortable.”

Ebony.com asked Brown, “What’s led you to blend different forms of world dance in your work?”

“In the early ’80s, people were discovering the facility in their body absent of emotion. I don’t get that. For me, dance is about something. It’s a sensibility thing. Is it just about “I can dance,” or demonstrating the technique? In traditional dance, there’s already a purpose in the dance. In Guinea, there’s a dance you do if a woman is having trouble holding onto a child. In Côte d’Ivoire, I learned dances that you do at a funeral. Or in Afro-Cuban dance, there’s a dance for opening the way. There’s a dance for fire, there’s a dance for change. And so I use those rhythms or steps. And because I touch it and I’m from Brooklyn, I can change [the dances], but that could be the vocabulary to influence this contemporary work.”

Click here for more information about “Porgy and Bess” on Broadway and to purchase tickets!

Show Your Spirit – dancing for sports teams

Bianca Argyros (ISVP ’11)

What team do you dance for?

I dance for the Canterbury Bulldogs.

Why did you decide to audition?

I decided to audition because I wanted to expand my training (as this is more cheeleading) and to gain extra technique.

What was the audition like?

The audition was great, really professional.  We had a dance audition featuring centre work and corner work and then we had an interview.

What is your favorite part about performing for a sports team?

My favorite part about being on the squad is performing at the games, there’s nothing I love better than performing. Also the charity work is great – giving back to the community means so much to me and i feel fantastic afterwards and encourage other to do so too.

Kimberly Hamilton (Professional Semester F’11)

What team do you dance for?

I dance for the Tampa Bay Rain ABA Basketball team.

Why did you decide to audition?

I auditioned because I was looking for a good starting point for a team dance and I knew a few of the girls trying out.

What was the audition like?

The audition process took a few weeks.  We had a 3 hour audition, then some girls were cut and we had 5 training camp sessions after that.  We learned routines and ran practice like usual and performed them in front of a second set of judges.  We were also weighed, measured, and given personal goals before we are allowed to perform.

What is your favorite part about performing for a sports team?

I love dancing with a sports team because of all the energy in the gym.  It’s always so much fun even when you’re not dancing. I’ve been on some type of dance team most of my life – having that group and support system is such a great experience!

Theater Review: Cougar, the musical

Let me begin by admitting that yes, I was the youngest member of the audience at a preview performance of “Cougar, the musical.”  That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed myself despite the fact that I am still a “baby cub.”  The cast was tremendously talented (I recognized Brenda Braxton, who played “Velma Kelly” when I saw “Chicago,” my very first Broadway musical back in 2006!).  The songs were memorable, especially the song in the nail salon when each of the three women are getting different manicure colors to help them “get up the nerve” to overcome their fears.

“Cougar The Musical is an original, four person show about three divine but disillusioned women who unleash their “inner cougar” by dating younger men (played by one very sexy actor) and in the process, find self-love and empowerment. The multi-talented cast sing and dance their way through songs ranging from grinding blues to doo wop, to pop to “Julio”, a romantic ballad sung to a vibrator. Hilarious, soulful and heartwarming, Cougar the Musical is a madcap ride from Cougar Bar to nail salon to boudoir and back as the women learn to say “yes” to getting older, “yes” to trust and friendship and “yes” to embracing their lives.”

Long story short, whether you’re a cougar or still a cub, “Cougar, the musical” will have you laughing, crying, singing and dancing along!

Performances are at
St. Luke’s Theatre
308 West 46th Street (between 8th & 9th Avenues)

Performance times are
Wednesday and Friday at 8pm
Saturday and Sunday at 2pm

Movie Review: Step Up 4 Revolution

On July 24th Broadway Dance Center faculty, staff, and program students packed the movie theater for an exclusive preview showing of the new Step Up movie.  The fourth movie of the Step Up enterprise, “Step Up 4 Revolution” takes place in Miami, FL where a group of dancers (“the MOB”) realize that they can organize intricate and creative flashmobs as a means of social change.  The film features cameos from dance notables such as Mia Michaels, Billy Bell, Misha Gabriel, and more.

After doing a little research online, I came across some no-so-great reviews of the film’s predictable plotline.  But Chris Hewitt (The Pioneer Times) sums it up well when he says, “[The] fourth installment hits on the perfect formula: more dance, less talk.”  After all, the film, which is probably 75% dancing, is called “Step Up” rather than “Speak Up.”  Hewitt continues, “Like all the “Step Up” movies, its plot jetes around a bunch of young hoofers trying to get ahead in the dance world.  But it’s set in Miami, so there is less clothing, and it features the most inventive choreography (by Jamal Sims) and staging of any of the four movies.”

“Step Up 4 was a brilliant work on how dancers can change the world…But not alone – we all need towork together.” – Daniel Montera (Professional Semester F’11)

“This was the best Step Up movie yet.  The precise movement and togetherness was astounding.  I loved how it was just “dance.” – Pierce Cady-Penny

Steppin’ Out with Ben Vereen

I meandered around the Capezio flagship store for about thirty minutes, simultaneously imagining my dream dance-wear closet and anxiously eyeing the clock above the elevator.  It was almost noon, and in just a few minutes Ben Vereen would be walking into the store for his “Meet and Greet” event.  I sat down on a bench and began fiddling with my phone to pass the time.  After a few minutes I looked up and saw Mr. Vereen enter the store.  I think he spotted me smiling from ear to ear because he walked straight to me and began to introduce himself.  “Oh my goodness,” I began, “You don’t have to introduce yourself. I’m here to see you!”

He shook my hand as I stood up beside him.  He was shorter than me, shorter than I’d imagined (though I’m rather tall).  I remember watching the PBS performance of “Fosse” on a VHS my dad helped me record  (and I decorated with golden star stickers and bubble letters).  I wasn’t obsessed with the Backstreet Boys or N’Sync when I was 10.  No, I was obsessed with all things Fosse.  I would watch the VHS (that’s “video home system” for all you youngin’s) over and over, trying to memorize and replicate the silky smooth choreography of Ben Vereen, Rachelle Rak, and Dana Moore.  My dad gave memy grandfather’s old English bowler hat so that I could practice flipping and twirling the cap with ease.  My dad even helped me build a dance cane (we took a wooden pole from Home Depot, painted it black, and nailed two chair-leg protectors to either end).  Long story short, meeting Ben Vereen was a dream come true!

Broadway legend and Tony Award winner Ben Vereen brings his hit show, Steppin’ Out with Ben Vereen, to 54 Below, July 10 – 21! A high energy tribute to the music of Broadway, along with musical selections made famous by the likes of Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis, Jr., audiences can expect to hear classics such as “Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries”, “Mr. Bojangles” and even “Defying Gravity”. Well known to theatre audiences for his Tony and Drama Desk winning performance in Pippin, Vereen has also appeared on Broadway in Wicked, Chicago, Fosse and Jelly’s Last Jam. Television audiences will remember him from his celebrated portrayal of Chicken George in Roots, along with recent appearances on How I Met Your Mother, Grey’s Anatomy (Prism Award) and Law & Order: Criminal Intent. In January, 2012, Mr. Vereen was inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame. 54 Below (254 W. 54th St. cellar)

Theater Review: I ♥ Bob

After accidentally but  understandably arriving at the Joyce Theater in Chelsea, Lily Lewis (SIP ’12) and I raced downtown to the Joyce SoHo to catch Ray Hesselink’s new tap show, “I ♥ Bob.”  The outside of the correct theater was unimposing – sort of like a chic garage.  We entered the theater huffing and puffing, having sprinted over from the subway stop.  We had no ticket, and merely had to give our name to the check-in table in exchange for a program (we had purchased our tickets online a few days in advance).  The theater itself was not the elaborate Broadway theater I was expecting, but rather a tiny black box with maybe fifty chairs on ascending risers from the ground-level stage.

“This live-action cartoon, directed by Mark Lonergan and choreographed by Ray Hesselink to music by Wayne Barker, pulls together the Parallel Exit signatures (tap and other dancing; grunts, coos, shrieks and other nonverbal sounds; puppetry; tirelessly inventive physical humor) to create a kind of exuberant ensemble vaudeville. The movement doesn’t let up, but the tempo is playful and breezy, and the performers make it look easy.” – Andy Webster (NY Times)

“I ♥ Bob” is essentially a dance narrative (dancing that tells a story) that includes voice overs, pantomime, puppetry, tap, and physical comedy.  The story obviously surrounds Bob and his extraordinary adventures as an ordinary guy.  Bob works as a “FedUp” delivery man but goes about his everydays trying (rather unsuccessfully) to save the world – walking an elderly woman across the street, saving a cat from a tree…you get the picture.  Besides loving Bob from the start, the audience also immediately falls in love with Vera, a buck-toothed plain Jane who dreams of finding her Prince Charming and living “happily ever after.”  Chaos (beyond the normal chaos of Manhattan) ensues with a rivalry between multigazillionaire Libby T. Grump (think Cruella de Vil + Donald Trump) and self-help schmuck Dwight Williams to chisel their face on the Statue of Liberty.  But don’t worry!  By the end of the show our lovebirds meet, Lady Liberty’s face remains intact, and the cast breaks out into a tap dancing finale – what could be better?